Tamron FAQs



Compatibility with Cameras and Teleconverters     VC (Vibration Compensation)
Names of Lenses     Troubleshooting     Repairs and Maintenance




Compatibility with Cameras and Teleconverters

Tamron lenses are designed to be compatible with specific camera brands and lens mounts. Currently Di and Di II lenses are compatible with Canon DSLR cameras with the EF and EF-S mounts, and with Nikon DSLR cameras with the F mount (note that some lenses will work with the newer mirrorless Canon RF and Nikon Z mounts with the appropriate lens adapter). Tamron lenses with the designation Di III are compatible with mirrorless cameras from specific camera brands and mounts (Canon EF-M, Fuji X, Olympus and Panasonic micro FourThirds, and Sony E mounts).



NO, Nikon teleconverters are specifically designed to be mounted only on designated Nikon lenses (due to a very specific cutout on the lens mount).



NO, Teleconverters are lens specific and will only work on designated lenses. Currently the Tamron Teleconverters (model TC-X14 & TC-X20) will only work on the SP 150-600mm (model A022), 100-400mm (model A035), 70-210mm (model A034), and 70-200mm (model A025).



NO, Sigma teleconverters cannot be guaranteed to work with Tamron lenses. Only Tamron teleconverters are compatible with Tamron lenses.





NO, Nikon teleconverters are specifically designed to be mounted only on designated Nikon lenses (due to a very specific cutout on the lens mount).



YES, The Nikon D3500 will accept all Tamron lenses with the lens designation of Di and Di II (with the mount for Nikon cameras).



NO, Canon teleconverters cannot be guaranteed to work with Tamron lenses. Only Tamron teleconverters are compatible with Tamron lenses.



Tamron manufactures both a 1.4x and 2x teleconverter, with the 1.4x you do loose 1 f stop (1 EV) of light and with the 2x you loose 2 f stops (2 EV) of light. Depending on what the maximum aperture is, of the lens that you mount the teleconverter to. A 2 f stop loss of light might cause a problem with the cameras AF system.





NO, Canon teleconverters cannot be guaranteed to work with Tamron lenses. Only Tamron teleconverters are compatible with Tamron lenses.



Tamron lenses are designed to be compatible with specific camera brands and lens mounts. Currently Di and Di II lenses are compatible with Canon DSLR cameras with the EF and EF-S mounts, and with Nikon DSLR cameras with the F mount (note that these lensed will work with the newer mirrorless Canon RF and Nikon Z mounts with the appropriate lens adapter). Tamron lenses with the designation Di III are compatible with mirrorless cameras from specific camera brands and mounts (Canon EF-M, Fuji X, Olympus and Panasonic micro FourThirds, and Sony E mounts).



Tamron makes Tamron brand lenses with Canon mounts.



NO, Nikon teleconverters are specifically designated to be mounted only on specific Nikon lenses (due to a very specific cutout on the lens mount).





Tamron lenses are designed to be compatible with specific camera brands and lens mounts. Currently Di and Di II lenses are compatible with Canon DSLR cameras with the EF and EF-S mounts, and with Nikon DSLR cameras with the F mount (note that these lenses will work with the newer mirrorless Canon RF and Nikon Z mounts with the appropriate lens adapter). Tamron lenses with the designation Di III are compatible with mirrorless cameras from specific camera brands and mounts (Canon EF-M, Fuji X, Olympus and Panasonic micro FourThirds, and Sony E mounts).



YES, Tamron lenses with the lens designation of Di III for Sony E, are compatible with all Sony mirrorless cameras. Tamron lenses with the lens designation of Di III-A for Sony E are compatible with Sony mirrorless cameras with an APS-C sensor (and will also work on Sony mirrorless cameras with a Full Frame Sensor but will be cropped down to APS-C).



YES, You can use a different brand lens on different brand cameras, but you must make sure that the lens is manufactured with the compatible mount to the camera model that you are using (or by using the appropriate lens adapter).



NO, Canon teleconverters cannot be guaranteed to work with Tamron lenses. Only Tamron teleconverters are compatible with Tamron lenses.





VC (Vibration Compensation)

VC or Vibration Compensation works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens (inside the lens barrel stands a lens element on a mechanism with three motors that will counteract Horizontal, Vertical, and Diagonal movements that can be caused by the user).



The acronym VC means Vibration Compensation, this is Tamron's in-lens Image Stabilization technology.



Image stabilization or VC should be turned off once you mount the camera and lens on a tripod.



YES, IS or VC (as it is called by Tamron) is an in-lens image stabilization system that works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens.





VC or Vibration Compensation works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens (inside the lens barrel stands a lens element on a mechanism with three motors that will counteract Horizontal, Vertical, and Diagonal movements that can be caused by the user).



YES, VC, VR, IS, OS, OIS are all acronyms for different manufacturers in-lens image stabilization systems.



The acronym VC means Vibration Compensation, this is Tamron's in-lens Image Stabilization technology.



VC or Vibration Compensation works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens (inside the lens barrel stands a lens element on a mechanism with three motors that will counteract Horizontal, Vertical, and Diagonal movements that can be caused by the user).





VC or Vibration Compensation mode can be found on some Tamron lenses. This allows the user to select from two or three different mode choices (depending on the lens). Mode 1: Standard ( you can see the amount of correction in real time), Mode 2: Exclusively for Panning( ideal for sports or wildlife), Mode 3: Framing Priority ( allows for faster subject acquisition and composition also offers the most amount of correction).



The acronym VC means Vibration Compensation, this is Tamron's in lens Image Stabilization technology.



VC or Vibration Compensation works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens (inside the lens barrel stands a lens element on a mechanism with three motors that will counteract Horizontal, Vertical, and Diagonal movements that can be caused by the user).



The meaning of the acronyms Di VC USD found on Tamron lenses are: Di (Digitally Integrated) lenses optimized for Full Frame and APS-C DSLR cameras. VC (Vibration Compensation) Tamron's in-lens image stabilization technology. USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) an upgraded AF drive system that delivers extraordinary autofocusing speed, along with virtually noiseless operation.





Names of Lenses

The acronym Di stands for Digitally Integrated ( lenses optimized for Full Frame and APS-C DSLR cameras).



Tamron is a Japanese optical company established in November of 1950.



The meaning of the acronyms Di VC USD found on Tamron lenses are: Di (Digitally Integrated) lenses optimized for Full Frame and APS-C DSLR cameras. VC (Vibration Compensation) Tamron's in-lens image stabilization technology. USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) an upgraded AF drive system that delivers extraordinary autofocusing speed, along with virtually noiseless operation.





Macro lenses are usually prime lenses (a lens with a fixed focal length) that have a close minimum focusing distance, capable of rendering a subject at a 1:1 reproduction ratio (the subject appears life size on the sensor).



Macro lenses come in different focal lengths and are usually prime lenses (a lens with a fixed focal length). Your selection should be based on your needs for a certain focal length i.e. wide angle, normal/ standard or telephoto and the need for a certain working distance (minimum focusing distance) as this can effect how much room there is between the lens and the subject.



Macro on a zoom lens indicates that the lens has a close minimum focusing distance that can achieve a reproduction ratio of greater than a 1:4.



YES, all Tamron macro lenses have a close minimum focusing distance and the capability of rendering the subject at a 1:1 reproduction ratio (the subject appears life size on the sensor) and can focus to Infinity, giving you the ability to use it as a normal lens.





Troubleshooting

An image shot of a subject with a wide angle lens at close distances will make the subject appear larger than it is in real life, and if shot at normal or farther distances will make the subject appear smaller than it is in real life. The wider the angle of the lens the more pronounced the effect will be.



The widest angle of view on a Tamron lens is 110 degrees that can be found on the 15-30mm for Full Frame DSLR, 105 degrees on the 11-20mm for Sony APS-C mirrorless and 103 degrees on the 17-28mm for Sony Full Frame mirrorless.



A wide angle picture can be seen as an image taken with a wide angle lens of a very large subject or scene from a close or far distance.



An photo taken of a subject with a wide angle lens at close distances will make the subject appear larger than it is in real life, and if shot at normal or farther distances will make the subject appear smaller than it is in real life. The wider the angle of the lens the more pronounced the effect will be.





Macro lenses usually have a maximum aperture of f/2 to f/2.8 but the apertures used when photographing are between f/8 to f/32.



Because of the limited Depth of Field caused by the close minimum focusing distance apertures of between f/8 to f/32 are usually needed.



In the case of a macro lens it would be the minimum focusing distance. As you get closer to the subject to increase the reproduction ratio you are also slightly increasing the focal length which in turn decreases the aperture. It is not uncommon for a macro lens that starts out with an f/2.8 maximum aperture go to f/5.6 at it's minimum focusing distance.



Because of the limited Depth of Field caused by the close minimum focusing distance apertures of between f/8 to f/32 are usually needed.





Zoom lenses extend by rotating the lens zoom ring



Zoom creep can be stopped by using the zoom lock. Lenses can be locked at their widest focal length.



These lenses feature a retractable lens barrel button, which when pressed and the zoom ring rotated, extend the length of the lens barrel. In addition, pressing the button automatically turns on the camera.



Focal length increases as you zoom out and decreases as you zoom in.





Three of the main flaws are spots with undefined edges (usually caused by dust on the imaging sensor), color fringing around a highlight or Chromatic Aberration (usually cause by the lens or the lack of correction in the lens), and ghosting a type of lens flare (usually caused when shooting directly into the sun, the lack of or poor lens coatings designed to mitigate the effects of ghosting caused by a strong light source being reflected repeatedly within the lens).



Spots or circles with undefined edges are usually caused by dust on the imaging sensor.



The best way to correct for flaws is to prevent them from occurring in the first place. In the case of spots simply make sure that you start with a clean imaging sensor. A high quality lens with a complex lens formula will eliminate Chromatic Aberration. A high quality lens with lens coatings, the use of a lens hood or changing your perspective will all mitigate Ghosting. Note that some of these flaws can be corrected in post processing.



A high quality lens with lens coatings designed for correcting lens flare and if using a filter use one with multiple lens coatings. The use of a lens hood or changing your perspective will mitigate Ghosting.





The acronym VC means Vibration Compensation, this is Tamron's in lens Image Stabilization technology.



The acronym VC means Vibration Compensation, this is Tamron's in lens Image Stabilization technology, Canon on the other hand uses IS Image Stabilization.



VC or Vibration Compensation mode can be found on some Tamron lenses. This allows the user to select from two or three different mode choices (depending on the lens). Mode 1: Standard ( you can see the amount of correction in real time), Mode 2: Exclusively for Panning( ideal for sports or wildlife), Mode 3: Framing Priority ( allows for faster subject acquisition and composition also offers the most amount of correction).



VC or Vibration Compensation works by stabilizing the image, by minimizing the movement caused when hand holding a camera in low light or with a telephoto lens (inside the lens barrel stands a lens element on a mechanism with three motors that will counteract Horizontal, Vertical, and Diagonal movements that can be caused by the user).





A rattling or clunking sound could be caused by an unparked VC unit. This can sometimes be resolved by doing the following: 1. turn the camera off and detach the lens 2. Re-attach the lens to the camera and turn camera on. 3. Activate the autofocus without release the shutter and wait for the autofocus motor and VC stop. 5. Turn off the camera. The VC should now be parked.



With most lens models the autofocus motor and VC may be audible.



A rattling noise can be a symptom of several things, including a loose part or unparked VC.



Lenses can be removed by depressing the lens release button on the camera and rotating the lens. Do not remove the lens until the autofocus motor and VC have settled.





Check that the lens zoom lock is not engaged. If they lens still does not zoom then service may be required.





Check that the zoom lock and Flex lock on not engaged. The Flex lock can be disengaged by pulling the zoom ring toward yourself. When the Flex lock in engaged you will be able to see a white line below the zoom ring.



Check that the zoom lock and Flex lock are not engaged.



If the zoom lock and Flex lock are not engaged and the zoom is jammed, the lens should be sent in for service.





Depending on the error code, it could mean different things. Many errors are caused by a lens or camera communication issue. If the error persists contact service for possible service or update information.





Lenses do occasionally require firmware updates. Information on which lenses require updates can be found on our website at https://www.tamron.jp/en/support/release_note.html.





Use lens cleaning pads or a microfiber cloth.



The inside of the lens should only be cleaned by Tamron service. Do not attempt to open the lens for cleaning.



Dust inside a lens will not affect image quality in most cases unless there are large particles or a significant amount. Dust in the rear element of the lens will be more visible than in the front element.



The front of the lens itself can be cleaned with a microfiber cloth to remove dust particles. The casing of the lens can be gently cleaned with a non-abrassive cloth. Do not use any chemicals or cleaning solutions to avoid risk of damaging the lens.





YES, Tamron lenses are compatible with Nikon cameras. Tamron lenses with the lens designation of Di and Di II (with the mount for Nikon cameras) are compatible with Nikon DSLR and Nikon mirrorless cameras with the compatible Nikon FTZ adapter.



Tamron lenses are designed to be compatible with specific camera brands and lens mounts. Currently Di and Di II lenses are compatible with Canon DSLR cameras with the EF and EF-S mounts, and with Nikon DSLR cameras with the F mount (note that these lenses will work with the newer mirrorless Canon RF and Nikon Z mounts with the appropriate manufacturer lens adapter). Tamron lenses with the designation Di III are compatible with mirrorless cameras from specific camera brands and mounts (Canon EF-M, Fuji X, Olympus and Panasonic MicroFourThirds, and Sony E mounts).



AF is an acronym that stands for Auto Focus



Firmware cannot be checked on the camera body with DSLR lenses but can be checked on Sony mirrorless lenses with a Sony camera. This can be found in the "Lens system software version" menu. For more details see this link: https://www.tamron.jp/en/support/e-mount_update.html.





Repairs and Maintenance

Lenses do occasionally require firmware updates. Information on which lenses require updates can be found on our website at https://www.tamron.jp/en/support/release_note.html.



Firmware updates typically correct an issue or add functionality to a lens



Firmware cannot be checked on the camera body with DSLR lenses but can be checked on Sony mirrorless lenses with a Sony camera. This can be found in the "Lens system software version" menu. For more details see this link: https://www.tamron.jp/en/support/e-mount_update.html



If firmware is not updated there may be potential issues with compatibility on some cameras and full functionality may not be supported.



Firmware cannot be checked on the camera body with DSLR lenses but can be checked on Sony mirrorless lenses with a Sony camera. This can be found in the "Lens system software version" menu. For more details see this link: https://www.tamron.jp/en/support/e-mount_update.html.





The inside of the lens should only be cleaned by Tamron service. Do not attempt to open the lens for cleaning.



Use lens cleaning pads or a microfiber cloth.



Dust inside a lens will not affect image quality in most cases unless there are large particles or a significant amount. Dust in the rear element of the lens will be more visible than in the front element.



The lens itself can be cleaned with a microfiber cloth.





The adjustment of focus on a lens can be changed by rotating the focus ring. This can be performed in auto mode or manual focus mode.



To correct front and back focus using the Tap in console see our Tap in Console instructional videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNXD2u5k0jzCA5QvOJcqlWv8MdiISnV83 For all other focusing issues please contact Tamron service.



Front and back focus can be adjusted in Tap in Console compatible lenses or sent directly to Tamron service.





NO, lens mounts are camera brand and can also be camera model specific. (However you may be able to use different lens mounts on different camera brands or camera models with a compatible lens adapter).



NO, lenses are camera brand and can also be camera model specific. (However you may be able to use different lens mounts on different camera brands or camera models with a compatible lens adapter).



NO, lens mounts are camera brand and can also be camera model specific. (However you may be able to use some lens mounts on different camera brands or camera models with a compatible lens adapter).